Biden’s COVID response strength risks turning into weakness

Positive public perception of the White House’s COVID-19 response is waning, as is the immunity of those vaccinated against the novel coronavirus.

But as President Joe Biden’s national agenda is threatened by Democratic bickering, the administration’s strategy of using the pulpit of bullies to shine a light on its response to the once popular pandemic becomes less effective and is likely to fail. alienate the main voters.

BIDEN’S PRO-SCIENCE COMMITMENT SEPARATED BY THE COVID BOOSTER EPISODE

During the 2020 campaign, pollsters found voters trusted Biden more to handle the COVID-19 outbreak than former President Donald Trump. And although that confidence persisted after Biden moved into the White House, it is slowly eroding, according to polls by Quinnipiac University and Fox News.

Quinnipiac University found that Biden’s COVID-19 job approval dropped to 50% this month, from 66% in May. At that time, his disapproval of the COVID-19 job was 31%. It is now 47%. Fox News found that Biden’s COVID-19 job approval this month is slightly higher, at 55%, while his disapproval is 44%. That’s down from 64% approval in June, when his disapproval was 34%.

But in a critical week for Biden’s $ 1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal and $ 3.5 trillion social and climate spending proposal, the White House continues to send a message focused on COVID.

“I thought it was infrastructure week,” joked Republican strategist Brian Johnson at the Washington Examiner.

For Johnson, director of lobbying and consulting firm Vogel Group, the White House was sticking to its COVID-19 message to avoid unwanted attention for unpopular components of the $ 3.5 trillion reconciliation package set aside for Democrats, including a new cigarette, cigar, and vape taxes.

“If you look at the president’s agenda, he’s run into a lot more things than the public health crisis we’re facing,” he told the Washington Examiner. “They don’t want to talk about these other things because it’s hard to say that you won’t raise taxes for people who earn less than $ 400,000 a year and your ‘Build Back Better Plan’ will raise taxes by. anyone who chooses to smoke. “

But the White House has also implemented divisive COVID-19 policies, such as the vaccine proposed by Biden or the testing mandate for private companies with 1,00 or more employees. In fact, one of Biden’s few public appearances this week is a trip to Chicago to promote the requirement.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, housed within the Ministry of Labor, is drafting the rule, which is expected to affect more than 80 million workers, according to White House press secretary Jen Psaki.

“What the president will continue to do is stimulate private sector companies and companies that have already established mandates, even as the rule-making process is underway,” he said. she declared.

While the same Quinnipiac poll this month found that 53% of those polled approved of the White House private companies’ vaccination mandate plan, 51% disapproved of Biden’s vaccine requirements more generally, and 48% disagreed. told pollsters his mandates went “too far.”

Republicans, including House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, are trying to capitalize on the data. Scalize, for example, amplifies Biden’s weakness through his weekly “Pandemic Report” newsletter as part of his role on the select committee on the coronavirus crisis.

The White House’s COVID-19 message coincides with behind-the-scenes efforts to ensure Liberal House Democrats back the $ 1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal when the chamber votes on it on Thursday. The bill was passed by the Senate last month, but Liberal Democrats have delayed consideration of it by the House as they try to pressure their centrist colleagues to support the bill’s proposal. $ 3.5 trillion in social and climate spending that they hope Congress will clear with budget reconciliation procedures.

The White House is simultaneously rushing toward a federal government shutdown, with funding set to expire on October 1. There’s also the problem with projections that the Treasury Department will soon run out of cash to pay off the country’s debts unless its borrowing limit is increased.

Psaki conceded Monday that “nothing is guaranteed” about Thursday’s infrastructure vote, but was adamant that Biden “will do whatever he can” to move his agenda forward. Her tone was different from that of last week, when she reiterated that the White House was determined to “win the vote.”

“That’s what the American people want. Roads, railroads, bridges, they’re not Republicans or Democrats,” she said. “So our zip code here is sometimes a little out of step with what the public wants. “

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Approval for Biden’s job has flowed since the summer, when the delta variant propelled an increase in COVID-19 cases, especially among unvaccinated people in the South. In general, public health remains a major concern of voters for the self-employed, just like the economy.

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